Saturday, December 24, 2011

Learn about Homonyms, Homophones, Homographs

What is the difference between homonyms and homophones? In fact, there is some confusion about the meaning of these three. This post is based on linguistics.

Homonyms are words that have the same spelling and pronunciation but have different meanings. For example, Rose (which refers to one type of flower) and Rose (which was passed in the form of growth) are written and pronounced the similar way.

Learn about Homonyms, Homophones, Homographs

Examples:

In short (short period) and short (underwear)
Bright (as opposed to dark) and bright (SMART)
Stem (to harass the following) and stem (part of plant)

Homographs

Homophones are the other words that have the same pronunciation, regardless of their spelling. If the spelling of homophones is also the same, they are at the same time, homonyms and homographs. For example, Miss (inability to hit something) and Miss (state of loneliness when a loved one is away) are homonyms (because of spelling and pronunciation) and at the same time, homophones (same sound) and homographs (same spelling). However, two and too all pronounced the same way but have different spellings. They are not homonyms, but they are homophones. Homophones, which have different spellings hyetographs.

Examples:

Book (which read) and book (reserve) are homophones, homonyms and homographs

Principle and principal are homophones

They are there and are homophones

Homographs are words that are spelled the same, no matter how they are pronounced. If homographs are pronounced the same, they are homophones. The first example of "Rose" (noun) and "Rose" (verb) homographs, homonyms, while homophones. If homographs are pronounced another way, they are called heteronyms. An example is the bow (weapon, arrow) and bow (bend). They are spelled the same but they differ when it comes to pronunciation.

Examples:

Bass (fish) and bass (low voice) are homographs, homonyms and homophones
Minute (small) and minute (time measure) are homographs

Wound (past form of wind) and wound (injury) are homographs, homonyms and homophones

These are the similarity and differences between homonyms, homophones and homographs.

2 comments:

  1. This collection is for family requirements only, and should not be regarded a complete collection of homonyms or homophones of the Terminology language.

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  2. I'm preparing for Bank PO English Exam and so was looking for some material online. Really your post helped me a lot... being enrolled in an online bank po exam course at http://www.wiziq.com/course/1208-english-for-bank-probationary-office-po-written-exam I look forward to net for all my educational queries and help and surely this proved to be an informative post.. thanks

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